The Environmental Protection Agency's "Submit a Technology Solution" web page, where even you can submit an idea as to how to clean up the Gulf oil disaster

The Environmental Protection Agency's "Submit a Technology Solution" web page, where you too can submit an idea as to how to clean up the Gulf oil disaster

As 200,000 gallons of crude continue to gush daily from the Deepwater Horizon well site in the Gulf of Mexico, it’s becoming more painfully obvious that no one — not the federal government, not the Gulf region marine scientists, not even BP’s own experts — has any clue how to even begin to clean up this mess. It turns out that what few options we have (including burning the oil or attempting to disintegrate it with toxic dispersants) may, in fact, do more harm than help.

Want some scary evidence that the cleanup efforts have become a complete crapshoot? Check out the Environmental Protection Agency’s very own “Submit a Technology” page on its website, where you and any shmoe with a corn cob and a prayer can suggest ideas to our federal government for how to mop up the spill.

I mean, really? Could you imagine if EPA had set up a similar website after the meltdown at Three Mile Island? Uh, well, we kind of allowed this technology to be built that had the potential to destroy our planet, but we never really figured out what to do if something went horribly wrong… Suggestions, anyone?

I said this today in my column today for HuffPost, and I’ll say it again: Because of our desperate need for oil and other fossil fuels, we’ve allowed corporations to develop ultra sophisticated technologies to plumb the depths of the ocean for oil, but not required them to construct solutions to deal with a disaster scenario when those technologies fail.

Not surprising, considering that BP spent $16 million lobbying Congress last year alone.

–Jennifer Grayson

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