When I read “La Vida Loba” in the April issue of Elle magazine — writer Sara Corbett’s personal narrative about her trek to a remote area of New Mexico to visit the home of her friend Loba, who had long since abandoned modern civilization to live a more primal existence — the part of the article that stuck with me the most was the description of the food that Loba prepared during the visit.

And then we ate. We ate the stuffed grape leaves. We ate steaming bowls of lentil soup and a thick slice of rye bread she’d made on the skillet. We had warm cups of brewed dandelion root topped off with capfuls of Kahlúa. Every once in a while I would blurt out some bit of small talk and Loba would silence it with one uttered word—“Yum!”—meant, I realized finally, to redirect us all to the simple, undistracted pleasure of tasting our food.

It’s always been a dream of mine to be able to grow my own food and savor it as simply and wonderfully as described above. Maybe it’s a reaction to the urban existence of my entire adult life (Philadelphia, Boston, New York City, and now Los Angeles) that has found me with nary a square of green land to call my own, but I became determined to grow something edible.

With no porch or patio in our current apartment, and a lone sunny spot in our kitchen, I decided to make use of a beautiful copper planter I had found and grow an organic indoor herb garden. It’s not a crop of vegetables, but it’s a start. And at $1.99 for each seedling I purchased from the nursery, it’s a heck of a lot more economical than spending $2.99 at Whole Foods for organic basil every time I want to make tomatoes and mozzarella.

–Jennifer Grayson

 Like this post? Subscribe to The Red, White, and Green RSS feed

7 Responses to “WATCH: Organic kitchen herb garden”

  1. Kimberly Says:

    Thanks for the inspiration. I’ve been saying for years I’m going to plant an indoor herb garden and, darn it, this will be the year I do it.

  2. Jennifer Grayson Says:

    Let me know how it goes. If you start with the little baby herb plants you can buy at your local nursery (for mere pennies), it’s not even like planting — you just plop them in a container!

  3. Kimberly Says:

    Well, I just planted some oregano, basil, rosemary, and parsley in a large indoor container using the starter baby plants. I also planted a tomato plant in an indoor container. We have a south facing room that gets tons of sun, so I’m hoping the tomato plant will work out in there along with the herbs. I’ll keep you posted.

  4. Jennifer Grayson Says:

    Fabulous, Kimberly — you finally did it! Let me know how it goes.

  5. Jennifer Grayson: Eco Etiquette: 16 Great Gifts for the Green Host or Hostess | Ecomentality@LifeDrop Says:

    [...] 5. Hand-potted herbs. Buy a few flavorful varieties at your local grocery store or nursery, then repot them in a vintage or antique planter. [...]

  6. Jennifer Grayson: Eco Etiquette: 16 Great Gifts for the Green Host or Hostess | Internet Health Info Says:

    [...] 5. Hand-potted herbs. Buy a few flavorful varieties at your local grocery store or nursery, then repot them in a vintage or antique planter. [...]

  7. Jennifer Grayson: Eco Etiquette: 16 Great Gifts for the Green Host or Hostess | World Current Events Says:

    [...] 5. Hand-potted herbs. Buy a few flavorful varieties at your local grocery store or nursery, then repot them in a vintage or antique planter. [...]

Leave a Reply